Pulsonix Ready for 2018


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Pulsonix has been developing PCB design software for almost 20 years, establishing a reputation for its full-featured, low-cost design tools. Now, the UK-based company wants to break into the US market, and Pulsonix recently showcased its latest tools at PCB West. During the show, I spoke with Business Development Manager Ty Stephens about the company’s latest tools and plans to become a major player in the US market.

Andy Shaughnessy: I'm here with Ty Stephens of Pulsonix. For some people who may not be aware, give us a little brief background of Pulsonix.

Ty Stephens: The company was founded in 1997. At that time there were no noticeably unified products in the market. By this, I mean all the tools you would expect to take an idea from concept to realization, for example schematic capture, Spice simulation, PCB layout and manufacturing preparation in one product environment. Most of the EDA products around were generally formed through mergers and acquisitions, so they ended up all being bolted together. We noticed there was an opportunity to have one unified product where it was schematic capture, simulation, PCB design, and now the 3D element, all within one system.

This is where we started when the product was released in 2001, now we've grown to the size that we are today, with household names using our software throughout the world every day to create their products.

Shaughnessy: The thing about Pulsonix is that you have this niche of having really robust tools, which are available at a low price point.

Stephens: Yes, I suppose for us it came from a point of view as a startup company but with considerable experience gained at our previous company, we understood the need for a very stable product offering, high quality support and very fast turnaround on software fixes. This was and still is our unique selling point. Functionality was equally as important, so we set out to create a great tool that met the needs of all users; large companies, small companies and individual users alike, each of these wanting to be able to design comprehensive products today without large overheads. We coupled this with an aggressive price point that instantly made us attractive in the market when you also consider the performance and functionality being offered.

To read this entire article, which appeared in the January 2018 issue of Design007 Magazine, click here.

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