Register for Zuken's December 6 Webinar: Best Practices for Using Quick-Turn Parts


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The temporary or quick turn part is a reality in today’s fast-moving design process. In many cases, a search of the corporate library comes up short and you need to explore the supply chain for that perfect part. Starting a design with an unapproved or temporary part is a common occurrence in today’s design environment. This reality has forced all of us to adopt policies and procedures that allow for the use of temporary parts. The biggest challenge with temporary parts is making sure that all of the design’s components have been validated and all remnants of the temporary parts have been successfully purged or converted to an approved part.

Attendees will learn best practices for using and managing temporary parts in a design process. Watch a live demonstration using a design data management system and learn how to prevent a temporary part from slipping through the release process and into manufacturing, all while you track and manage parts throughout the design cycle.

Date/Time
December 6, 2017 2 pm Eastern Time

Register
For more information or to register, click here.

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